Knowledge Source

Training@Twitter

#ResultsThroughRelationships

How do you get time for training in one of the fastest moving environments around? And, how do you gain people’s attention when your company is literally processing the world in real-time?

Simple: You build stronger relationships based on a common language that speeds communication, improves collaboration, and gets better business results. And that’s what’s happening @Twitter.

#CommonLanguage

Twitter chose the SDI because it gives people a powerful common language. And it’s not just because “Blue” is only four characters. Although “a person who is deeply concerned about the welfare of others and wants to help them” does take up 83 characters. “Blue” saves space and time, but it also increases clarity and shared understanding.

The colors (shorthand for personality types in the SDI) make it easy for people to quickly recognize what’s driving others. The colors, and deep meaning behind them, also help to dispel the incorrect interpersonal judgements that get in the way in fast-moving environments.

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Boys and Girls Clubs of America

Strengthening Accountability

How would you like to be accountable to 4 million boys and girls? Just ask the staff at Boys and Girls Clubs of America (BGCA). Every year, they are accountable to help these children grow, develop, thrive, and fulfill their potential.


But the staff is also accountable to each other – and to themselves. That’s where Core Strengths Accountability training comes in. The training grounds personal accountability where it belongs – with each person. It helps BGCA staff identify their core drives and strengths, understand each other better, and gives them a common language to clean up some of the inherent messiness of working together.
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Positive People Perform Better At Work

Accountability Raises PsyCap You might have a hard time saying that 10 times quickly, but that doesn’t make it any less true. It’s been proven by scholarship in the emerging field of positive organizational behavior, but it also reflects the experiences of anyone who has managed people for more than a few days. Just think about the times when you’ve had one of those grumpy, glass-half-empty folks on your team. An Eeyore isn’t very productive and tends to drag down the productivity of others, as well What’s less well known, however, is how personal accountability creates more positive people—the kind of people you fight to have on your team. That’s because personal accountability improves your team’s PsyCap. My team’s what? you ask. Psychological capital, or PsyCap, is a relatively new term researcher coined when describing the benefits of positivity. Dr. Fred Luthans, the George Holmes Distinguished Professor of Management at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has identified four PsyCap components: self-efficacy, hope, optimism, and resilience. Luthans and his fellow researchers believe people can develop these elements through brief training interventions. But what kind of training addresses all of these psychological constructs? Does it even exist? The answer is found in a...

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Raising the Bar from Engagement to Ownership

Missing the Mark If you think employee engagement is good for business, then you aren’t alone. And if you think business isn’t good at creating employee engagement, then, again, you aren’t alone. A recent global survey by Deloitte confirms other studies and what many of us instinctively understand -- that there’s a gap between what leaders know to be important (employee engagement) and how well business creates that engagement. That’s why studies routine show that only about 40 percent of full-time workers are highly engaged. That leaves the other 60 percent feeling unsupported, detached, or disengaged.Clearly, such numbers don’t engender a great deal of confidence in the ability of businesses to provide the performance lift needed to win in a competitive global economy. Typical attempts to improve engagement often involve small changes like free coffee in the break room, relaxed dress codes, or flexible work schedules. More enlightened companies might go further by increasing opportunities for employee growth and development, more clearly defining career paths, or encouraging greater work-life balance. None of these changes are inappropriate. In fact, they are likely to be helpful in small ways—steps in the right direction. Winning in a highly competitive global marketplace, however, requires...

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Ten Things Accountable People Never Say

Few things are more frustrating than hearing co-workers constantly shifting blame and denying accountability for the results of their teams. What’s worse, however, is reacting to those co-workers by expressing the same types of frustrations. Accountable people are different. They take ownership of their responsibilities and take initiative to make things happen. They connect what needs to be done with why it’s important—to them, the organization, and other key stakeholders. This link sparks initiative and opens the door to a wide array of strengths that can be chosen based on the situation and the needs of the people involved. Accountability is a liberating and energizing force, but it does limit our vocabulary when interacting with people. So one way to see if accountability is an issue for you or your teams is to listen to what’s being said. Specifically, here are 10 things accountable people never say… 1. I don’t have a choice. We always have choices, but people allow their personal filters and the circumstances they’re in to limit their perception of choice. We can only choose from the options we see, so if we have a self-limiting view, we don’t see all of the options we have. 2....

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People.
Performance.
Process.

Download the Core Strengths: Results Through Relationships Overview
  • Learn the how of working better together
  • Develop the skill of collaborative communication
  • Inspire greater personal authenticity
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